207 images for omo river

  • 862-06676697

    A young Dassanech boy drinks muddy water from the Omo River, Ethiopia

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  • 862-03437084

    A Dassanech girl braids her sister's hair at her village in the Omo Delta. Much the largest of the tribes in the Omo Valley numbering around 50,000,the Dassanech (also known as the Galeb,Changila or Merille) and Nilotic pastoralists and agriculturalists.

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  • 862-03820547

    The decorated leather apron or skirt of a young Nyangatom girl. The numerous white discs woven into the strands of braided leather are made of ostrich shell.The Nyangatom are one of the largest tribes and arguably the most warlike people living along the Omo River in Southwest Ethiopia.

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  • 862-06676694

    A large dugout canoe ferries Dassanech people across the Omo River, Ethiopia

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  • 862-03820557

    A Nyangatom mother and young daughter in typical dress. Rugged skin clothing is still widely used.The Nyangatom are one of the largest tribes and arguably the most warlike people living along the Omo River in Southwest Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03354066

    A Nyangatom woman grinds sorghum using two stones. Typical of her tribe,she wears a heavily beaded calfskin skirt,multiple layers of bead necklaces and metal bracelets and amulets. The Nyangatom or Bume are a Nilotic tribe of semi-nomadic pastoralists who live along the banks of the Omo River in south-western Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03820551

    A Nyangatom woman grinds sorghum using a flat stone.The Nyangatom are one of the largest tribes and arguably the most warlike people living along the Omo River in Southwest Ethiopia.They form a part of the Ateger speaking people a cluster of seven eastern Nilotic tribes to which the Turkana of Northern Kenya and the Karamajong of Eastern Uganda belong.

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  • 862-03820351

    An old Dassanech man wearing a traditional metal lip ornament and metal earrings. His broad ivory armbands and his ivory tobacco container hanging round his neck, are uncommon because elephants no longer frequent the Omo Delta.The Dassanech people live in the Omo Delta of southwest Ethiopia, one of the largest inland deltas in the world.

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  • 862-03820347

    A young Daasanech girl beside the Omo River. Her hairstyle, necklaces and metal armbands are typical of her tribe.The Dassanech people live in the Omo Delta of southwest Ethiopia, one of the largest inland deltas in the world.

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  • 841-03063668

    Jumping fertility dance, Karo tribe, Omo River, Ethiopia, Africa

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  • 862-03354069

    A tourist accompanied by a retinue of children in a Dassanech settlement along the lower Omo River. Much the largest of the tribes in the Omo Valley numbering around 50,000,the Dassanech (also known as the Galeb,Changila or Merille) and Nilotic pastoralists and agriculturalists.

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  • 862-06676703

    A Pink-backed Pelican on the flooded banks of the Omo River, Ethiopia

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  • 862-06676696

    A young Dassanech herdsboy runs across shallow water beside the Omo River. The river bursts its banks annually during heavy rain in the Ethiopian Highlands, Ethiopia

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  • 862-06676698

    Dassanech villagers line the banks of the Omo River, Ethiopia

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  • 862-03820452

    Karo girls paint their faces in preparation for a dance. It is a tradition for girls to pierce a hole below the lower lip in which they place a thin piece of metal or a nail for decoration. Elaborate scarification is not an unusual form of body decoration.The Karo are a small tribe living in three main villages along the lower reaches of the Omo River in southwest Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03820457

    A Karo girl in traditional attire stands outside her familys home.The door of the low entrance to the house is propped against its thatched wall.Most girls pierce a hole below the lower lip in which they place a thin piece of metal or a nail for decoration.The Karo are a small tribe living in three main villages along the lower reaches of the Omo River in southwest Ethiopia.

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  • 862-06676726

    A young Dassanech girl drinking dirty water from the Omo River, Ethiopia

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  • 841-03676192

    Cattle at the Omo River, Omo Valley, Ethiopia, Africa

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  • 862-03354085

    A young Dassanech boy silhouetted against the evening sky at his settlement alongside the Omo River. Much the largest of the tribes in the Omo Valley numbering around 50,000,the Dassanech (also known as the Galeb,Changila or Merille) are Nilotic pastoralists and agriculturalists.

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  • 862-03820436

    A Karo women stands in the doorway to her hut in the village of Duss. A small Omotic tribe related to the Hamar, who live along the banks of the Omo River in southwestern Ethiopia, the Karo are renowned for their elaborate body painting using white chalk, crushed rock and other natural pigments. In addition to painting her face she has decorated her body with whorls of goat hair tied by leather co

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  • 862-03354097

    A Karo woman wears an elaborate headdress made from the wing-cases of beetles and a cape of calf skin fringed with cowrie shells. A small Omotic tribe related to the Hamar,who live along the banks of the Omo River in southwestern Ethiopia,the Karo are renowned for their elaborate body painting using white chalk,crushed rock and other natural pigments.

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  • 862-03820472

    A Mursi girl with circular clay ear ornaments in her pierced ears wears a heavy metal skirt. This form of dress is common among young girls.The Mursi speak a Nilotic language and have affinities with the Shilluk and Anuak of eastern Sudan. They live in a remote area of southwest Ethiopia along the Omo River.

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  • 862-03354096

    A Karo woman wears an elaborate headdress made from the wing-cases of beetles and a cape of calf skin fringed with cowrie shells. A small Omotic tribe related to the Hamar,who live along the banks of the Omo River in southwestern Ethiopia,the Karo are renowned for their elaborate body painting using white chalk,crushed rock and other natural pigments.

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  • 862-03820437

    A Karo woman with her face painted in preparation for a dance in the village of Duss. A small Omotic tribe related to the Hamar, who live along the banks of the Omo River in southwestern Ethiopia, the Karo are renowned for their elaborate body painting using white chalk, crushed rock and other natural pigments. She is wearing a goatskin apron and carries a leather belt decorated with cowrie shells

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  • 862-03354070

    A tourist accompanied by a retinue of children in a Dassanech settlement along the lower Omo River. Much the largest of the tribes in the Omo Valley numbering around 50,000,the Dassanech (also known as the Galeb,Changila or Merille) and Nilotic pastoralists and agriculturalists.

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  • 862-03354101

    A Mursi girl stands with a clay pot on her head . Within the Omo Valley,the Mursi have a reputation for being extremely fierce and aggressive. They are also renowned for their skill at making clay pots.

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  • 862-06676727

    Dassanech women carry water to their village from the Omo River, Ethiopia

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  • 862-06676695

    A man poles a dugout canoe past a Dassanech village near the banks of the Omo River, Ethiopia

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  • 862-03354081

    A young Dassanech girl holds her little brother. She wears a leather skirt with an elaborate fringe of wooden and metal tassles. Much the largest of the tribes in the Omo Valley numbering around 50,000,the Dassanech (also known as the Galeb,Changila or Merille) are Nilotic pastoralists and agriculturalists.

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  • 862-03354062

    A Nyangatom girl churns butter in a gourd suspended in the entrance to her hut. Typical of her tribe,she is wearing multiple layers of beads in necklaces,and an elaborately beaded calfskin skirt. The Nyangatom or Bume are a Nilotic tribe of semi-nomadic pastoralists who live along the banks of the Omo River in south-western Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03354100

    A young Dassanech boy with an elaborate clay hairdo and headband of beads at his village in the Omo Delta. Much the largest of the tribes in the Omo Valley numbering around 50,000,the Dassanech (also known as the Galeb,Changila or Merille) and Nilotic pastoralists and agriculturalists.

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  • 862-03354067

    A rainbow rises behind the temporary grass huts of a Nyangatom settlement. The Nyangatom or Bume are a Nilotic tribe of semi-nomadic pastoralists who live along the banks of the Omo River in south-western Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03354080

    A young Dassanech girl holds her little brother. She wears a leather skirt with an elaborate fringe of wooden and metal tassles. Much the largest of the tribes in the Omo Valley numbering around 50,000,the Dassanech (also known as the Galeb,Changila or Merille) are Nilotic pastoralists and agriculturalists.

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  • 862-03354060

    A Nyangatom woman wearing an elegant skirt with a short beaded fringe at the font and long calfskin tail reaching the ground at the back. This woman has a broad belt decorated with cowrie shells. The Nyangatom or Bume are a Nilotic tribe of semi-nomadic pastoralists who live along the banks of the Omo River in south-western Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03354065

    A Nyangatom woman grinds sorghum using two stones. Typical of her tribe,she wears a heavily beaded calfskin skirt,multiple layers of bead necklaces and metal bracelets and amulets. The Nyangatom or Bume are a Nilotic tribe of semi-nomadic pastoralists who live along the banks of the Omo River in south-western Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03354098

    A young Karo girl in the doorway of her hut in the village of Duss. A small Omotic tribe related to the Hamar,who live along the banks of the Omo River in southwestern Ethiopia,the Karo are renowned for their elaborate body painting using white chalk,crushed rock and other natural pigments.

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  • 862-03820361

    In the late afternoon, family and friends sit outside a high dome roofed Karo home.The Karo excel in body art. Before a dance, they will decorate their faces and torsos elaborately using local white chalk, pulverised rock and other natural pigments. The polka dot or guinea fowl plumage effect is popular.

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  • 862-03820429

    A Nyangatom woman wears multiple layers of beads in necklaces, an elaborately beaded calfskin skirt and metal bracelets, amulets and anklets. She is standing beside a temporary beehive construction of sticks, grass and leaves built to provide shade for her goats. The Nyangatom or Bume are a Nilotic tribe of semi-nomadic pastoralists who live along the banks of the Omo River in south western Ethio

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  • 841-02903107

    Omo River, Lower Omo Valley, southern Ethiopia, Ethiopia, Africa

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  • 862-03354033

    A young Karo girl decorates her friends face. A small Omotic tribe related to the Hamar,who live along the banks of the Omo River in southwestern Ethiopia,the Karo are renowned for their elaborate body painting using white chalk,crushed rock and other natural pigments.

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  • 862-03354086

    A Dassanech girl leaning against a bale of cattle fodder on a raised platform is silhouetted against the evening sky at a settlement alongside the Omo River. Much the largest of the tribes in the Omo Valley numbering around 50,000,the Dassanech (also known as the Galeb,Changila or Merille) are Nilotic pastoralists and agriculturalists.

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  • 862-03437080

    A Nyangatom girl weaves a grass basket. The Nyangatom or Bume are a Nilotic tribe of semi-nomadic pastoralists who live along the banks of the Omo River in south-western Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03354063

    A Nyangatom warrior has painted his body and face in preparation for a dance. Most adult males carry rifles both as status symbols and in case of cattle raids or disputes with neighbouring tribes. The Nyangatom or Bume are a Nilotic tribe of semi-nomadic pastoralists who live along the banks of the Omo River in south-western Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03354090

    A Dassanech woman milks a cow by hand collecting the milk in a gourd at a settlement alongside the Omo River. Much the largest of the tribes in the Omo Valley numbering around 50,000,the Dassanech (also known as the Galeb,Changila or Merille) are Nilotic pastoralists and agriculturalists.

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  • 862-03354099

    A Dassanech woman winnows grain by pouring it from her metal tin and letting it fall onto a calfskin. Much the largest of the tribes in the Omo Valley numbering around 50,000,the Dassanech (also known as the Galeb,Changila or Merille) and Nilotic pastoralists and agriculturalists.

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  • 862-03820343

    Ethiopia, Southwest Ethiopia, Omo River.Sunset on the banks of the Omo River near a Dassanech village.Two dome shaped granaries are just visible in the trees.

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  • 862-03820349

    Men and women dance during a month long Dassanech ceremony. The men wear leopard, cheetah or serval cat skins draped on their backs and black ostrich feather headdresses. The women, dressed in skins, hang a single black and white colobus monkey skin down their backs.

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  • 862-03820364

    A Mursi woman wearing a large wooden lip plate. Shortly before marriage, a girls lower lip will be pierced and progressively stretched over a year or so. The size of the lip plate often determines the quantum of the bride price. They live in a remote area of southwest Ethiopia along the Omo River.

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  • 862-03820359

    Karo men excel in body art. Before a dance, they will decorate their faces and torsos elaborately using local white chalk, pulverised rock and other natural pigments. While older men style their hair with clay, young men prefer to braid theirs.Every man carries a wooden stool, which doubles as a pillow at night.The Karo are a small tribe living in three main villages along the lower reaches of the

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  • 862-03820350

    A Dassanech man in full tribal regalia participates in a dance during a month long ceremony. He wears a cheetah skin draped on his backs and a black ostrich feather headdress. He dances holding a long stick and a simulated shield.His face is smeared with mud giving him a singular appearance.

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  • 862-03820420

    An elder of the Karo tribe rests with his head on his wooden head rest which protects his elaborate clay hairdo. Every man carries a headrest which doubles as a stool. This man has attached his snuff box to it. A small Omotic tribe related to the Hamar, who live along the banks of the Omo River in southwestern Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03820458

    Dusk on the Omo River.The Omo River rises in the Ethiopian Highlands and flows for over 600 miles before discharging its waters into the northern end of Lake Turkana.Once a year following rains in the highlands, the river rises and bursts its banks, flooding the low-lying plains.Without flooding, there would be no agriculture because the annual rainfall of the region is too low.

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  • 862-03820427

    A Nyangatom woman stands with her baby on her hip beside her grass hut in his temporary camp. Nyangatom married women wear elaborately beaded skirts which reach the ground at the back and often have panels of different coloured calkfskin sewn into the tail The Nyangatom or Bume are a Nilotic tribe of semi nomadic pastoralists who live along the banks of the Omo River in south western Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03820423

    Karo men dance by jumping up in the air holding hands. Each age group of warriors come forward in turn and dance together, advancing as they dance higher and higher until they finish with a last high leap. A small Omotic tribe related to the Hamar, the Karo live along the banks of the Omo River in southwestern Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03820431

    A Nyangatom boy holds a cow whilst another boy draws his bow ready to fire an arrow with a very short head into the artery of the cow so they can bleed it. Several pints of blood will be collected which will then be mixed with milk and drunk by the Nyangatom. The Nyangatom or Bume are a Nilotic tribe of sem nomadic pastoralists who live along the banks of the Omo River in south western Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03354034

    A young Karo girl shows off her attractive make up. A small Omotic tribe related to the Hamar,who live along the banks of the Omo River in southwestern Ethiopia,the Karo are renowned for their elaborate body painting using white chalk,crushed rock and other natural pigments.

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  • 862-03354083

    Two young Dassanech boys sport elaborate clay hairdos at their settlement alongside the Omo River. Much the largest of the tribes in the Omo Valley numbering around 50,000,the Dassanech (also known as the Galeb,Changila or Merille) are Nilotic pastoralists and agriculturalists.

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  • 862-03820449

    Karo girls chat in the shade of the riverine forest that lines the banks of the Omo River. It is a tradition for girls to pierce a hole below the lower lip in which they place a thin piece of metal or a nail for decoration.The Karo are a small tribe living in three main villages along the lower reaches of the Omo River in southwest Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03820432

    A young Nyangatom woman carries her baby on her hip in an elaborately braided papoose. Her hair has been reddened with a mixture of ochre and animal fat. Typical of her tribe, she wears a calfskin skirt, multiple layers of bead necklaces and metal bracelets and amulets. The Nyangatom or Bume are a Nilotic tribe of semi nomadic pastoralists who live along the banks of the Omo River in south western

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  • 862-03820430

    A Nyangatom boy holds a cow whilst another boy draws his bow ready to fire an arrow with a very short head into the artery of the cow so they can bleed it. Several pints of blood will be collected which will then be mixed with milk and drunk by the Nyangatom. The Nyangatom or Bume are a Nilotic tribe of sem nomadic pastoralists who live along the banks of the Omo River in south western Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03820558

    A lively Nyangatom dance is enjoyed by villagers in the late afternoon.The elevated houses in the background are both homes and granaries, which have been built to withstand flooding when the Omo River bursts its banks The Nyangatom are one of the largest tribes and arguably the most warlike people living along the Omo River in Southwest Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03354073

    A Dassanech man shows off his distinctive hairdo and ornamentation. Much the largest of the tribes in the Omo Valley numbering around 50,000,the Dassanech (also known as the Galeb,Changila or Merille) are Nilotic pastoralists and agriculturalists.

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  • 862-03354061

    Nyangatom men their faces and bodies with stylised patterns using natural pigments obtained from chalk,ochre and crushed rock prior to a dance. The young men then form a circle linking arms and take it in turns to dance around the inside of of the circle. The Nyangatom or Bume are a Nilotic tribe of semi-nomadic pastoralists who live along the banks of the Omo River in south-western Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03354108

    A Dassanech man ferries people in a large dug-out canoe across the crocodile-infested waters of the Omo River near its delta at the northern end of Lake Turkana. The Omo has one of the largest inland deltas in the world and is home to a large section of Dassanech people who speak a language of Eastern Cushitic origin.

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  • 862-03820424

    Karo men dance by jumping up in the air holding hands. Each age group of warriors come forward in turn and dance together, advancing as they dance higher and higher until they finish with a last high leap. A small Omotic tribe related to the Hamar, the Karo live along the banks of the Omo River in southwestern Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03820357

    The Karo of the Lower Omo River excel in body art. They decorate their faces and torsos elaborately using local white chalk, pulverised rock and other natural pigments. Even young children daub their faces before a dance.The Karo are a small tribe living in three main villages along the lower reaches of the Omo River in southwest Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03820358

    Karo men excel in body art. Before a dance, they will decorate their faces and torsos elaborately using local white chalk, pulverised rock and other natural pigments. While older men style their hair with clay, young men prefer to braid theirs.Every man carries a wooden stool, which doubles as a pillow at night.The Karo are a small tribe living in three main villages along the lower reaches of the

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  • 862-03820434

    A Dassanech man shows off his distinctive painted clay hairdo. The central panel consists of tightly packed coils of sisal thread extracted from grain sacks that allow the scalp to breathe underneath the clay. The scarification on his chest indicates that he has killed a man in combat. Much the largest of the tribes in the Omo Valley numbering around 50,000, the Dassanech, also known as the Galeb,

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  • 862-03354039

    Two Karo children stand together,with their arms round each other. A small Omotic tribe related to the Hamar,who live along the banks of the Omo River in southwestern Ethiopia,the Karo are renowned for their elaborate body painting using white chalk,crushed rock and other natural pigments.

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  • 862-03820428

    A Nyangatom woman with ornamental scarring on her stomach. The scarrs are made with a razor and then infected with ash and cow dung to cause the raised welts.The Nyangatom or Bume are a Nilotic tribe of semi-nomadic pastoralists who live along the banks of the Omo River in south-western Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03820550

    A Nyangatom woman dries sorghum and other corn in the vicinity of her elevated grain stores, which prevent loss when the Omo River bursts its banks.The Nyangatom are one of the largest tribes and arguably the most warlike people living along the Omo River in Southwest Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03437083

    Karo men paint each other in preparation for a dance in the village of Duss. A small Omotic tribe related to the Hamar,who live along the banks of the Omo River in southwestern Ethiopia,the Karo are renowned for their elaborate body painting using white chalk,crushed rock and other natural pigments.

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  • 862-03820344

    A cluster of Dassanech granaries line the banks of the Omo River. The dome shaped granaries are kept high off the ground to protect them from flood damage.

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  • 862-03820360

    Karo men excel in body art. Before a dance, they will decorate their faces and torsos elaborately using local white chalk, pulverised rock and other natural pigments. While older men style their hair with clay, young men prefer to braid theirs.Every man carries a wooden stool, which doubles as a pillow at night.The Karo are a small tribe living in three main villages along the lower reaches of the

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  • 862-03820456

    A Karo girl wears a necklace of ballpoint pen tops interspersed with seeds.Most girls pierce a hole below the lower lip in which they place a thin piece of metal or a nail for decoration.The Karo are a small tribe living in three main villages along the lower reaches of the Omo River in southwest Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03820365

    A Mursi woman wearing a large clay lip plate. Shortly before marriage, a girls lower lip will be pierced and progressively stretched over a year or so. The size of the lip plate often determines the quantum of the bride price. They live in a remote area of southwest Ethiopia along the Omo River, the country's largest river.

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  • 862-03820362

    A Karo mother and child. Heavy metal bracelets are common among older women.The Karo are a small tribe living in three main villages along the lower reaches of the Omo River in southwest Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03354074

    A young Dassanech boy shows off his distinctive painted clay hairdo. The central panel consists of tightly packed coils of sisal thread extracted from grain sacks that allow the scalp to breathe underneath the clay. Much the largest of the tribes in the Omo Valley numbering around 50,000,the Dassanech (also known as the Galeb,Changila or Merille) are Nilotic pastoralists and agriculturalists.

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  • 862-03820433

    The distinctive hair style of this Dassanech man, achieved using a combination of clay, animal fat and ochre, signifies that he has killed a man recently. Much the largest of the tribes in the Omo Valley numbering around 50,000, the Dassanech, also known as the Galeb, Changila or Merille, are Nilotic pastoralists and agriculturalists.

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  • 862-03820455

    Two young Karo boys with their faces and torsos painted in readiness for a dance.Karo men excel in body art.They use local white chalk, pulverised rock and other natural pigments to decorate themselves elaborately.The Karo are a small tribe living in three main villages along the lower reaches of the Omo River in southwest Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03820419

    An elder of the Karo tribe, a small Omotic tribe related to the Hamar, who live along the banks of the Omo River in southwestern Ethiopia. The Karo are renowned for their elaborate body painting using white chalk, crushed rock and other natural pigments. This man also has a clay hairdo typical of tribal elders.

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  • 862-03820454

    Two pretty Karo girls in traditional attire. Most girls pierce a hole below the lower lip in which they place a thin piece of metal or a nail for decoration.They will paint their faces with local white chalk before a dance.The Karo are a small tribe living in three main villages along the lower reaches of the Omo River in southwest Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03354071

    A Dassanech man shows off his distinctive clay hairdo. The central pannel consists of tightly packed coils of sisal thread extracted from grain sacks that allow the scalp to breathe underneath the clay. Much the largest of the tribes in the Omo Valley numbering around 50,000,the Dassanech (also known as the Galeb,Changila or Merille) are Nilotic pastoralists and agriculturalists.

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  • 862-03820435

    Ethiopia, Omo Delta.A young Dassanech girl wears her hair partially braided and coated in animal fat and ochre. Typical of her tribe, she has on a leather skirt, metal bracelets and amulets and layers of bead necklaces. A long leather strap decorated with cowrie shells hangs down her back. Much the largest of the tribes in the Omo Valley numbering around 50,000, the Dassanech, also known as the G

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  • 862-03820367

    A Mursi girl, accompanied by her dog, carries a large clay pot to collect water from the Omo River. Her earlobes are already pierced and extended, and decorated with round clay discs.She is dressed in skins, attractively decorated with thin stripes.The culture, social organisation, customs and values of the people have changed little.

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  • 862-03820473

    A Mursi mother and child.The mother shades her shaven head from the sun with a small decorated leather apron.The Mursi speak a Nilotic language and have affinities with the Shilluk and Anuak of eastern Sudan. They live in a remote area of southwest Ethiopia along the Omo River.

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  • 862-03820366

    Two Mursi men with singular hairstyles play a game of bau as a young boy watches them. Most men possess rifles to protect their families from hostile neighbours.Body art is an important aspect of Mursi culture.They live in a remote area of southwest Ethiopia along the Omo River.

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  • 862-03354084

    A young Dassanech boy silhouetted against the evening sky at his settlement alongside the Omo River. Much the largest of the tribes in the Omo Valley numbering around 50,000,the Dassanech (also known as the Galeb,Changila or Merille) are Nilotic pastoralists and agriculturalists.

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  • 862-03354038

    Two Karo children stand together,arm in arm. A small Omotic tribe related to the Hamar,who live along the banks of the Omo River in southwestern Ethiopia,the Karo are renowned for their elaborate body painting using white chalk,crushed rock and other natural pigments.

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  • 862-03820363

    Shaded from the hot sun, a Karo woman grinds sorghum using large flat stones.It is customary for females of the tribe when in their teens to make a small hole in the flesh below their lower lips into which they put an ornament, this woman has used a small nail. Numerous heavy metal bracelets are worn by married womenThe Karo are a small tribe living in three main villages along the lower reaches o

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