African tribal girls stock photos and images

234 images of african tribal girls photos, pictures, african tribal girls stock photography

  • 862-03437161 A young Maasai girl wears a headband decorated with chains and cowrie shells that signifies her recent circumcision. Clitodectomy was commonly practiced by the Maasai but it is now gradually dying out. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03355141 A Maasai girl in traditional attire. The predominant white colour of her beadwork and the circular scar on her cheek denote that she is from the Kisongo section of the Maasai,the largest clan group,which lives either side of the border in Kenya and Tanzania. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03353992 An attractive girl from the Kediyo tribe carries a large,beautifully made umbrella. Its wooden frame is covered with the dried leaves of ensete,the false banana plant (seen growing in the background). Widely cultivated in southern Ethiopia,ensete roots and stems,which are rich in carbohydrates,are either cooked and eaten as a porridge or made into bread. Rights-Managed
  • 700-02694015 Portrait of Himba Girl, Opuwo, Namibia Rights-Managed
  • 862-03366047 Samburu girls are given strings of beads by their fathers when they are still young. As soon as they are old enough to have lovers from the warrior age-set,they regularly receive gifts from them. Over a period of years,their necklaces can smother them up to their necks. The metal cross-like ornament hanging from the girl's headband has no religious significance. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03808715 A Maasai girl from the Kisongo clan wearing an attractive beaded headband and necklace. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03366133 Song is an art form ingrained in Turkana culture. After months of separation,young men and girls gather together during the rains when grass is abundant and life is relatively easy for a while. The Turkana have a rich repertoire of at least twenty dances,most of which are quite energetic. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03355134 In the early morning,a Maasai herdsboy and his sister drive their family's flock of sheep across the friable,dusty plains near Malambo in northern Tanzania. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03366406 Gabbra women sing and dance to celebrate a wedding. The traditional metal ornamentation on their heads is called malmal. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03366405 Gabbra women sing and dance to celebrate a wedding. The traditional metal ornamentation on their heads is called malmal. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03366383 Laikipiak Maasai Girl Dancing Rights-Managed
  • 700-02693943 Two Himba Children, Namibia Rights-Managed
  • 862-03355173 A Hadza woman digs for edible tubers with a digging stick.The Hadzabe are a thousand-strong community of hunter-gatherers who have lived in the Lake Eyasi basin for centuries. They are one of only four or five societies in the world that still earn a living primarily from wild resources. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03366174 A young Maasai girl wearing a wooden plug in her pierced ear to elongate the earlobe. It has been a tradition of the Maasai for both men and women to pierce their ears and elongate their lobes for decorative purposes. Her two lower incisors have been removed - a common practice that may have resulted from an outbreak of lockjaw a long time ago. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03366058 During Samburu wedding celebrations,warriors resplendent with long Ochred braids dance with young girls who have put on all their finery for the occasion. Both warriors and girls smear their faces,necks and shoulders with red ochre mixed with animal fat to enhance their appearance. Two spears are tipped with ostrich-feather pompoms. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03366175 A young Maasai girl keeps the holes in her pierced ears from closing with grass and rolled leaves. She will gradually stretch her earlobes by inserting progressively larger wooden plugs. By tradition,both Maasai men and women pierce and elongate their earlobes for decorative purposes. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03820557 A Nyangatom mother and young daughter in typical dress. Rugged skin clothing is still widely used.The Nyangatom are one of the largest tribes and arguably the most warlike people living along the Omo River in Southwest Ethiopia. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03366138 Turkana women and girls are responsible for watering livestock,which is unusual among pastoral societies. Here,a young girl waters goats from a waterhole dug in the sand of a seasonal watercourse. Her young brother will control the flow of stock to the water trough. In the background,a man digs out another waterhole; they have to been deepened regularly towards the end of the dry season. Rights-Managed
  • 862-06542285 Merti, Northern Kenya. Two children peer from the door of their home. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03355175 A Hadza girl wearing a beaded headband and necklaces.The Hadzabe are a thousand-strong community of hunter-gatherers who have lived in the Lake Eyasi basin for centuries. They are one of only four or five societies in the world that still earn a living primarily from wild resources. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03366589 A Samburu woman wearing a mporro necklace,which signifies her married status.These necklaces,once made of hair from giraffe tails,are now made from fibres of doum palm fronds (Hyphaene coriacea). The beads are mid-19th century Venetian glass beads,which were introduced to Samburuland by early hunters and traders. Rights-Managed
  • 700-01993278 Portrait of Hamer Tribeswoman, Omo Valley, Ethiopia Rights-Managed
  • 862-03437157 A young Samburu girl dances during a wedding celebration. By arching her back and thrusting out her chest,she flicks her beaded necklaces up and down while dancing silently to the songs of the warriors. Her body and necklace have been smeared with red ochre,and her eyebrows blackened with charcoal dust mixed with animal fat. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03366122 A young Turkana girl with her head shaved except for a tuft,which is braided. This is the usual hairstyle for women and girls. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03366056 During Samburu wedding celebrations,married women congregate apart from the warriors and young girls to sing in praise of the couple and to dance. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03366046 Samburu girls are given strings of beads by their fathers when they are still young. As soon as they are old enough to have lovers from the warrior age-set,they regularly receive gifts from them. Over a period of years,their necklaces can smother them up to their necks. The metal cross-like ornament hanging from the girl's headband has no religious significance. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03366172 A young Maasai girl in all her finery pauses at the entrance to her mother's home. The wall and roof of the house are plastered with a mixture of cow dung and soil. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03820644 A Samburu woman wearing a mporro necklace, which denotes her married status. These necklaces were once made of hair from giraffe tails but nowadays, the fibres of doum palm fronds, Hyphaene coriacea, are used instead.The red beads after which the necklace is named are wound glass beads made in Venice c.1850. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03366590 A Samburu woman singing. The strings of black and white beads hanging from her ears signify that she has two grown-up sons who are warriors of the tribe. Note: the traditional horn snuff container hanging from her neck. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03820464 A Hamar girl in traditional attire.The Hamar are an attractive people with striking styles and clothes. Skins are widely used for clothing and cowrie shells are popular adornments yet the sea is 500 miles from their home. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03366120 A proud Turkana father and his young daughter. Both their hairstyles are typical of tribal custom in the west of Turkanaland. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03820547 The decorated leather apron or skirt of a young Nyangatom girl. The numerous white discs woven into the strands of braided leather are made of ostrich shell.The Nyangatom are one of the largest tribes and arguably the most warlike people living along the Omo River in Southwest Ethiopia. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03366119 Childhood is brief in nomadic communities. From an early age,Turkana girls help their mothers with the household chores,while boys learn to look after the small stock. There are only short periods in a day when children can relax and play. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03366281 A young Pokot girl in traditional attire. Girls wear leather skirts and capes made from home-tanned goatskins. Her broad necklaces are made from small segments of sedge grass. Her ears have already been pierced in four places,ready to insert the large brass earrings she will acquire after marriage. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03366127 A young Turkana girl wearing an attractively beaded leather apron and belt stands outside her mother's home. Sansevieria or wild sisal lines the lower walls of the house. Cicatrization round the nipples of a girl is not an uncommon form of beautification. Rights-Managed
  • 848-03272957 Baka girl with crab caught by drilling the bank around the burrow, Cameroon Rights-Managed
  • 862-03354066 A Nyangatom woman grinds sorghum using two stones. Typical of her tribe,she wears a heavily beaded calfskin skirt,multiple layers of bead necklaces and metal bracelets and amulets. The Nyangatom or Bume are a Nilotic tribe of semi-nomadic pastoralists who live along the banks of the Omo River in south-western Ethiopia. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03888696 A Pokot warrior wearing a cheetah skin jumps high in the air surrounded by young women to celebrate an Atelo ceremony. The Pokot are pastoralists speaking a Southern Nilotic language. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03366023 A Samburu Warrior drives his goats along the wide,sandy seasonal watercourse of the Milgis where waterholes dug by the Samburu in the dry season are a lifeline for pastoralists in this semi-arid region of their district. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03736834 A Samburu girl waters her family s goats at a waterhole dug in a seasonal river bed. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03366111 A Turkana girl's necklaces are well-oiled with animal fat and glisten in the sun. Occasionally,a girl will put on so many necklaces that her vertebrae stretch and her neck muscles gradually weaken. The partially shaven head is typical of Turkana women and girls. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03366170 A young Maasai girl wears face paint and numerous beaded ornaments in preparation for a dance with warriors. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03820367 A Mursi girl, accompanied by her dog, carries a large clay pot to collect water from the Omo River. Her earlobes are already pierced and extended, and decorated with round clay discs.She is dressed in skins, attractively decorated with thin stripes.The culture, social organisation, customs and values of the people have changed little. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03366171 Maasai girls in all their finery and with bells tied round their legs wait at the entrance to a house before dancing with warriors. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03820347 A young Daasanech girl beside the Omo River. Her hairstyle, necklaces and metal armbands are typical of her tribe.The Dassanech people live in the Omo Delta of southwest Ethiopia, one of the largest inland deltas in the world. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03820646 A Samburu woman wearing a mporro necklace, which denotes her married status. These necklaces were once made of hair from giraffe tails but nowadays, the fibres of doum palm fronds, Hyphaene coriacea, are used instead.The red beads after which the necklace is named are wound glass beads made in Venice c.1850. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03366112 A young Turkana girl has had the rims of her ears pierced in seven places and keeps the holes open with small wooden sticks. After marriage,she will hang leaf-shaped metal pendants from each hole. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03366057 The invited guests at a Samburu wedding gather together to sing in praise of the couple and to dance. Celebrations will go on late into the night. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03736835 A Samburu girl herds her family s goats near a waterhole dug in a seasonal river bed. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03366049 Samburu girls paint each others faces with abstract designs in readiness for a dance. Already,their necks and beaded necklaces have been coated with red ochre. Only girls and warriors decorate their faces; the orange powder they use is called blue. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03366480 Gabbra women dance at a gathering in the village of Kalacha. The Gabbra are a Cushitic tribe of nomadic pastoralists living with their herds of camels and goats around the fringe of the Chalbi Desert. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03366025 A Samburu girl drives her family's flocks of fat-tailed sheep and goats to grazing grounds after her brothers have watered them from wells dug in the Milgis - a wide,sandy seasonal watercourse that is a lifeline for Samburu pastoralists in the low-lying,semi-arid region of their land. Rights-Managed
  • 700-01993253 Mursi Tribeswoman and Baby, Omo Valley, Ethiopia Rights-Managed
  • 862-03366028 In the early morning,young Samburu girls take kids to their mothers. They will then milk the nanny goats leaving half the milk for the kids. Only women and children milk goats although every member of the family will drink the milk. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03820357 The Karo of the Lower Omo River excel in body art. They decorate their faces and torsos elaborately using local white chalk, pulverised rock and other natural pigments. Even young children daub their faces before a dance.The Karo are a small tribe living in three main villages along the lower reaches of the Omo River in southwest Ethiopia. Rights-Managed
  • 862-03366603 A young Pokot girl wears large necklaces made from the stems of sedge grass,which are then plastered with a mixture of animal fat and red ochre before being decorated with buttons and beads. Rights-Managed
  • 862-06677174 Herero tribal girls portrait, Damaraland, Namibia, Africa Rights-Managed
  • 700-01993260 Portrait of Mursi Tribeswoman, Omo Valley, Ethiopia Rights-Managed
  • 848-03272994 Ngongo (Megaphrynium macrostachyum) leaves used by Baka girl to make a Mongolu, a hut made from sticks and leaves, Cameroon Rights-Managed
  • 862-03366626 A young student in her classsroom at the local school,Lewa Conservancy,Kenya Rights-Managed