237 images for african tribal girls

  • 862-03820644

    A Samburu woman wearing a mporro necklace, which denotes her married status. These necklaces were once made of hair from giraffe tails but nowadays, the fibres of doum palm fronds, Hyphaene coriacea, are used instead.The red beads after which the necklace is named are wound glass beads made in Venice c.1850.

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  • 862-03366590

    A Samburu woman singing. The strings of black and white beads hanging from her ears signify that she has two grown-up sons who are warriors of the tribe. Note: the traditional horn snuff container hanging from her neck.

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  • 862-03820464

    A Hamar girl in traditional attire.The Hamar are an attractive people with striking styles and clothes. Skins are widely used for clothing and cowrie shells are popular adornments yet the sea is 500 miles from their home.

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  • 862-03366281

    A young Pokot girl in traditional attire. Girls wear leather skirts and capes made from home-tanned goatskins. Her broad necklaces are made from small segments of sedge grass. Her ears have already been pierced in four places,ready to insert the large brass earrings she will acquire after marriage.

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  • 862-03820547

    The decorated leather apron or skirt of a young Nyangatom girl. The numerous white discs woven into the strands of braided leather are made of ostrich shell.The Nyangatom are one of the largest tribes and arguably the most warlike people living along the Omo River in Southwest Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03366127

    A young Turkana girl wearing an attractively beaded leather apron and belt stands outside her mother's home. Sansevieria or wild sisal lines the lower walls of the house. Cicatrization round the nipples of a girl is not an uncommon form of beautification.

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  • 862-03366023

    A Samburu Warrior drives his goats along the wide,sandy seasonal watercourse of the Milgis where waterholes dug by the Samburu in the dry season are a lifeline for pastoralists in this semi-arid region of their district.

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  • 848-03272957

    Baka girl with crab caught by drilling the bank around the burrow, Cameroon

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  • 862-03366119

    Childhood is brief in nomadic communities. From an early age,Turkana girls help their mothers with the household chores,while boys learn to look after the small stock. There are only short periods in a day when children can relax and play.

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  • 862-03354066

    A Nyangatom woman grinds sorghum using two stones. Typical of her tribe,she wears a heavily beaded calfskin skirt,multiple layers of bead necklaces and metal bracelets and amulets. The Nyangatom or Bume are a Nilotic tribe of semi-nomadic pastoralists who live along the banks of the Omo River in south-western Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03736834

    A Samburu girl waters her family s goats at a waterhole dug in a seasonal river bed.

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  • 862-03820646

    A Samburu woman wearing a mporro necklace, which denotes her married status. These necklaces were once made of hair from giraffe tails but nowadays, the fibres of doum palm fronds, Hyphaene coriacea, are used instead.The red beads after which the necklace is named are wound glass beads made in Venice c.1850.

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  • 862-03366111

    A Turkana girl's necklaces are well-oiled with animal fat and glisten in the sun. Occasionally,a girl will put on so many necklaces that her vertebrae stretch and her neck muscles gradually weaken. The partially shaven head is typical of Turkana women and girls.

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  • 862-03366170

    A young Maasai girl wears face paint and numerous beaded ornaments in preparation for a dance with warriors.

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  • 862-03888696

    A Pokot warrior wearing a cheetah skin jumps high in the air surrounded by young women to celebrate an Atelo ceremony. The Pokot are pastoralists speaking a Southern Nilotic language.

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  • 862-03820367

    A Mursi girl, accompanied by her dog, carries a large clay pot to collect water from the Omo River. Her earlobes are already pierced and extended, and decorated with round clay discs.She is dressed in skins, attractively decorated with thin stripes.The culture, social organisation, customs and values of the people have changed little.

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  • 862-03366171

    Maasai girls in all their finery and with bells tied round their legs wait at the entrance to a house before dancing with warriors.

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  • 862-03820347

    A young Daasanech girl beside the Omo River. Her hairstyle, necklaces and metal armbands are typical of her tribe.The Dassanech people live in the Omo Delta of southwest Ethiopia, one of the largest inland deltas in the world.

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  • 862-03366627

    Two young Samburu girls help each other preparing for a celebration,Wamba District,Kenya

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  • 862-03366112

    A young Turkana girl has had the rims of her ears pierced in seven places and keeps the holes open with small wooden sticks. After marriage,she will hang leaf-shaped metal pendants from each hole.

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  • 700-02693950

    Masai WOman with Child, Kenya

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  • 862-03366057

    The invited guests at a Samburu wedding gather together to sing in praise of the couple and to dance. Celebrations will go on late into the night.

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  • 862-03366049

    Samburu girls paint each others faces with abstract designs in readiness for a dance. Already,their necks and beaded necklaces have been coated with red ochre. Only girls and warriors decorate their faces; the orange powder they use is called blue.

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  • 862-03366025

    A Samburu girl drives her family's flocks of fat-tailed sheep and goats to grazing grounds after her brothers have watered them from wells dug in the Milgis - a wide,sandy seasonal watercourse that is a lifeline for Samburu pastoralists in the low-lying,semi-arid region of their land.

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  • 848-03272994

    Ngongo (Megaphrynium macrostachyum) leaves used by Baka girl to make a Mongolu, a hut made from sticks and leaves, Cameroon

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  • 700-01993253

    Mursi Tribeswoman and Baby, Omo Valley, Ethiopia

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  • 862-03366480

    Gabbra women dance at a gathering in the village of Kalacha. The Gabbra are a Cushitic tribe of nomadic pastoralists living with their herds of camels and goats around the fringe of the Chalbi Desert.

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  • 862-03736835

    A Samburu girl herds her family s goats near a waterhole dug in a seasonal river bed.

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  • 862-03820357

    The Karo of the Lower Omo River excel in body art. They decorate their faces and torsos elaborately using local white chalk, pulverised rock and other natural pigments. Even young children daub their faces before a dance.The Karo are a small tribe living in three main villages along the lower reaches of the Omo River in southwest Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03366258

    A girl from the Ogiek community of hunter-gathers living in the Mau Forest keeps warm in a cowhide. Following Maasai custom,she wears a decorated headband which marks her recent circumcision.

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  • 862-03366603

    A young Pokot girl wears large necklaces made from the stems of sedge grass,which are then plastered with a mixture of animal fat and red ochre before being decorated with buttons and beads.

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  • 700-01993260

    Portrait of Mursi Tribeswoman, Omo Valley, Ethiopia

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  • 851-02961296

    Samburu National Park,Samburu,Kenya

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  • 862-03366099

    Almost everything a Turkana family owns is kept in a wife's day hut. Wooden containers,gourds,utensils and personal clothing or ornaments hang from the ceiling or walls. Watering troughs,donkeys panniers and a grinding stone lean against the walls. The wife's eldest daughter will look after the home during the day while being nanny to her younger brothers and sisters.

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  • 862-06677174

    Herero tribal girls portrait, Damaraland, Namibia, Africa

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  • 841-02707359

    Young Hamer girl carries her baby sister on her back in a goat skin baby carrier, Dombo village, Turmi, Lower Omo valley, Ethiopia, Africa

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  • 862-03366626

    A young student in her classsroom at the local school,Lewa Conservancy,Kenya

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  • 862-06677175

    Herero tribal girls portrait, Damaraland, Namibia, Africa

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  • 862-03366137

    Turkana women and girls are responsible for watering livestock,which is unusual among pastoral societies. Here,a girl waters cattle from a Waterhole dug in the sand of a seasonal watercourse. The Turkana manipulate the horns of their ox's into perfect symmetry or any whimsical shape that takes the owner's fancy.

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  • 862-03366175

    A young Maasai girl keeps the holes in her pierced ears from closing with grass and rolled leaves. She will gradually stretch her earlobes by inserting progressively larger wooden plugs. By tradition,both Maasai men and women pierce and elongate their earlobes for decorative purposes.

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  • 862-03366481

    Gabbra women dance at a gathering in the village of Kalacha. The Gabbra are a Cushitic tribe of nomadic pastoralists living with their herds of camels and goats around the fringe of the Chalbi Desert.

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  • 862-03821020

    A Datoga woman in traditional attire, which includes beautifully tanned and decorated leather dresses and coiled brass necklaces and ear ornaments.Extensive scarification of the face with raised circular patterns is not uncommon among women and girls.

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  • 862-03366027

    In the early morning,a young Samburu girl takes a kid to its mother. She will then milk the nanny goat leaving half the milk for the kid. Only women and children milk goats although every member of the family will drink the milk.

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  • 862-03888693

    Pokot women wearing traditional beaded ornaments and brass earrings denoting their married status. celebrate an Atelo ceremony. The Pokot are pastoralists speaking a Southern Nilotic language.

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  • 862-03736855

    A happy El Molo girl. The cowrie in her hair is a good luck charm.

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  • 862-03366134

    Song is an art form ingrained in Turkana culture. At the end of a dance session,the participants invariably enjoy the Song of the Bulls. Each young man will take centre-stage to extol the praises of his favourite ox. He will explain how it came into his possession,its distinguishing traits and with outstretched arms,imitate the shape of its horns.

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  • 841-02917051

    Hamer (Hamar) people at Evangadi dancing (Hamer night dance), Dombo village, Turmi, Lower Omo Valley, Ethiopia, Africa

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  • 862-03354062

    A Nyangatom girl churns butter in a gourd suspended in the entrance to her hut. Typical of her tribe,she is wearing multiple layers of beads in necklaces,and an elaborately beaded calfskin skirt. The Nyangatom or Bume are a Nilotic tribe of semi-nomadic pastoralists who live along the banks of the Omo River in south-western Ethiopia.

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  • 862-06542284

    Merti, Northern Kenya. A nomadic Somali family migrates to find new grazing in drought conditions.

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  • 862-03820348

    An old Dassanech woman prepares her fields beside the Omo River with a digging stick in readiness to plant sorghum. This crude form of agricultural implement is in common use in this remote part of Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03366026

    A Samburu woman milks a camel at her homestead in the early morning. The proximity of the calf helps to stimulate the flow of milk. Baby camels have a wool-like texture to their coats,which they lose after six month.

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  • 862-03365497

    Niger,Timia Oasis. Local Tuareg woman. Traditionally,Muslim Tuareg women do not wear veils but the men keep their faces covered.

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  • 862-03354087

    A Dassanech girl leaning against a bale of cattle fodder on a raised platform is silhouetted against the evening sky at a settlement alongside the Omo River. Much the largest of the tribes in the Omo Valley numbering around 50,000,the Dassanech (also known as the Galeb,Changila or Merille) are Nilotic pastoralists and agriculturalists.

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  • 862-03366282

    A young married woman of the Pokot tribe. Her married status is denoted by her large brass earrings and broad beaded collars and necklaces that are smeared with animal fat to glisten in the sun.

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  • 862-03355144

    Three Maasai girls sit on the edge of Shimu la Mungu (a volcanic blow hole known as 'God's hole') with the extinct volcano,Kerimasi,in the distance.

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  • 862-03821002

    A Datoga woman relaxes outside her thatched house.The traditional attire of Datoga women includes beautifully tanned and decorated leather dresses and coiled brass armulets and necklaces.The Datoga live in northern Tanzania and are primarily pastoralists.

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  • 851-02961970

    People with faces painted white,Matemo Island,Quirimbas archipielago,Mozambique

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  • 862-03820645

    A Samburu woman wearing a mporro necklace, which denotes her married status. These necklaces were once made of hair from giraffe tails but nowadays, the fibres of doum palm fronds, Hyphaene coriacea, are used instead.The red beads after which the necklace is named are wound glass beads made in Venice c.1850.

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  • 862-03355135

    In the early morning,a Maasai family drives their livestock across the friable,dusty plains near Malambo in northern Tanzania.

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  • 862-03821003

    A Datoga woman relaxes outside her thatched house.The traditional attire of Datoga women includes beautifully tanned and decorated leather dresses and coiled brass armulets and necklaces. Extensive scarification of the face with raised circular patterns is not uncommon among women and girls.

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  • 832-03724977

    Henna patterns on hands

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  • 862-03366161

    Two young Maasai girls help to herd their family's cattle near a waterhole in the foothills of Ol doinyo Orok (the Black Mountain). Childhood is very short in Maasailand; children begin to help their parents at a young age and may never attend school.

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  • 862-03820649

    A Samburu bride waits pensively outside her new home until she is enticed in with promises of cattle.Her wedding gown is made of three goatskins, which are well oiled and covered in red ochre.She carries on her back a gourd full of milk and a small wooden jar containing butter.She now wears the mporro necklace of married women.

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  • 700-01633229

    Himba Children Drinking Water, Namibia, Africa

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  • 862-03366029

    Samburu women are responsible for collecting firewood and carrying it to their homes. Supported by leather straps over their foreheads,the loads they carry would make most strong men groan under the weight Fire is a potent symbol of life; the fire in the hearth of a Samburu house must never be allowed to die out.

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  • 862-03354088

    A Dassanech girl leaning against a bale of cattle fodder on a raised platform is silhouetted against the evening sky at a settlement alongside the Omo River. Much the largest of the tribes in the Omo Valley numbering around 50,000,the Dassanech (also known as the Galeb,Changila or Merille) are Nilotic pastoralists and agriculturalists.

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  • 862-03366110

    A Turkana girl's necklaces are well-oiled with animal fat and glisten in the sun. The use of red ochre has been copied from their Samburu neighbours and is not widespread. Occasionally,a girl will put on so many necklaces that her vertebrae stretch and her neck muscles gradually weaken. The partially shaven head is typical of Turkana women and girls.

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  • 856-06304177

    Mother and child.

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  • 856-06303383

    Smiling girl from the Bumi tribe.

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  • 841-02917052

    Ari girl, Lower Omo Valley, Ethiopia, Africa

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  • 841-03505106

    Portait of a Mursi girl with clay lip plate, and hairstyle that indicates she is going through puberty,The Mursi Hills, Mago National Park, Lower Omo Valley, Ethiopia, Africa

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  • 841-03674812

    Mursi girl, Omo Valley, Ethiopia, Africa

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  • 862-03365496

    Niger,Timia Oasis. Two Tuareg Children in the Oasis village of Timia.

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  • 841-02917048

    Woman painting her daughter's face, Mago National Park, Lower Omo Valley, Ethiopia, Africa

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  • 400-06687818

    Figures of african dancers . Seamless Vector Illustration.

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  • 400-05914316

    Figures of african dancers . Vector Illustration.

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  • 862-03820427

    A Nyangatom woman stands with her baby on her hip beside her grass hut in his temporary camp. Nyangatom married women wear elaborately beaded skirts which reach the ground at the back and often have panels of different coloured calkfskin sewn into the tail The Nyangatom or Bume are a Nilotic tribe of semi nomadic pastoralists who live along the banks of the Omo River in south western Ethiopia.

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  • 400-08611958

    Vector sketch of afican woman. Editable layers.

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  • 841-03674815

    Young Mursi woman, Omo Valley, Ethiopia, Africa

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  • 862-03820541

    A Nyangatom girl with unusual body scarification.The Nyangatom are one of the largest tribes and arguably the most warlike people living along the Omo River in Southwest Ethiopia. They form a part of the Ateger speaking people a cluster of seven eastern Nilotic tribes to which the Turkana of Northern Kenya and the Karamajong of Eastern Uganda belong.

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  • 862-03820544

    A group of Nyangatom girls and women with beautifully decorated leather skirts gather to dance.The Nyangatom are one of the largest tribes and arguably the most warlike people living along the Omo River in Southwest Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03820437

    A Karo woman with her face painted in preparation for a dance in the village of Duss. A small Omotic tribe related to the Hamar, who live along the banks of the Omo River in southwestern Ethiopia, the Karo are renowned for their elaborate body painting using white chalk, crushed rock and other natural pigments. She is wearing a goatskin apron and carries a leather belt decorated with cowrie shells

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  • 873-06440975

    Group Of Masai People in Traditional Dress

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  • 841-02916992

    Hamer lady wearing traditional goat skin dress decorated with cowie shells, carrying kalash on her way to market, Dombo village, Turmi, Lower Omo valley, Ethiopia, Africa

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  • 862-03821031

    A Datoga woman relaxes outside her thatched house.The traditional attire of Datoga women includes beautifully tanned and decorated leather dresses and coiled brass armbands and necklaces.Scarification of the face is not uncommon among women and girls.

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  • 862-03711116

    Two Hamar girl in fashionable dress at Turmi market. The Hamar are semi-nomadic pastoralists of Southwest Ethiopia whose women and girls wear striking traditional dress. Skins are widely used for clothing and heavy metal necklaces,bracelets and anklets form part of their adornments. Cowries are also popular yet the sea is 500 miles from Hamar country.

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  • 862-03820432

    A young Nyangatom woman carries her baby on her hip in an elaborately braided papoose. Her hair has been reddened with a mixture of ochre and animal fat. Typical of her tribe, she wears a calfskin skirt, multiple layers of bead necklaces and metal bracelets and amulets. The Nyangatom or Bume are a Nilotic tribe of semi nomadic pastoralists who live along the banks of the Omo River in south western

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  • 862-03736996

    Namibia, Bushmanland. A young San (Bushman) woman at Nhoqma village (pronounced //Nhoq'ma) near Tsumkwe in northeast Namibia.

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  • 862-03711115

    A Hamar girl in traditional attire. Her leather skirt is made from the twisted strands of goatskin. Cowries are always popular to embellish a woman's or girl's appearance.The Hamar are semi-nomadic pastoralists who live in harsh country around the Hamar Mountains of Southwest Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03820478

    In the late afternoon, a group of Dassanech children wave to passing visitors along a bank of the Omo River in Southwest Ethiopia.The Dassanech speak a language of Eastern Cushitic origin.They live in the Omo Delta and they practice animal husbandry and fishing as well as agriculture.

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