237 images for african tribal girls

  • 700-07067371

    Portrait of Himba children, Kaokoveld, Namibia, Africa

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  • 862-03711120

    An Afar girl has tribal scarification on her cheeks. Scarification is practiced in only a few sections of her tribe. Proud and fiercely independent,the nomadic Afar people live in the low-lying deserts of Eastern Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03366114

    A pretty young Turkana girl has already had the flesh below her lower lip pierced in readiness for a brass ornament after her marriage. The rims of her ears have also been pierced and the holes kept open with small wooden sticks.

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  • 700-07067372

    Close-up portrait of Himba children, Kaokoveld, Namibia, Africa

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  • 873-06440208

    Bushmen Singing and Dancing Kalahari Desert, Botswana

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  • 700-08169185

    Portrait of girl carrying sandals on her head, near Gaoua, Poni Province, Burkina Faso

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  • 862-03353991

    A pretty Borana girl at Mega in southern Ethiopia wears brightly coloured cotton cloth and numerous strings of beads. The pastoral Borana live either side of the southern Ethiopian/northern Kenya border and form a large and important group of the Oromo-speaking cluster of tribes.

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  • 873-06440237

    Impala Herd and Bushman Mother And Child

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  • 700-07067376

    Portrait of Himba woman, showing hairstyle of Himba women, Kaokoveld, Namibia, Africa

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  • 700-07067374

    Red Ochre (or ocher stone) pigment used by Himba to create a reddish tint, Kaokoveld, Namibia, Africa

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  • 862-03366294

    An attractive young girl from the nomadic Gabbra tribe.

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  • 862-03437084

    A Dassanech girl braids her sister's hair at her village in the Omo Delta. Much the largest of the tribes in the Omo Valley numbering around 50,000,the Dassanech (also known as the Galeb,Changila or Merille) and Nilotic pastoralists and agriculturalists.

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  • 862-06677176

    Herero tribal girl portrait, Damaraland, Namibia, Africa

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  • 862-03366116

    Two Turkana girls set off to fetch water from a nearby Waterhole. Their water containers are made of wood by the women of the tribe. Their 'V' shaped aprons are made of goatskin and have been edged with hundreds and hundreds of round discs fashioned out of ostrich eggshells.

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  • 862-03366188

    A Giriama girl from Kenya's Coast Province carrying a gourd full of water on her head. Her small skirt is made from strips of printed cotton material.

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  • 700-08169189

    Mother holding child in arms while nursing, black and yellow patterns, Gaoua, Poni Province, Burkina Faso

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  • 862-03352642

    A pretty tousle-haired girl of the nomadic Afar tribe wears bright colours in stark contrast to the drab,windswept surroundings of Lake Abbe.

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  • 862-03366117

    A Turkana girl in all her finery. Among the Turkana,cicatrization is a common form of beautification. She wears a crucifix given to her by a missionary; they are popular ornaments despite not necessarily being associated with Christianity.

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  • 862-03366113

    A young Turkana girl adorned with necklaces of a style the Southern Turkana prefer to wear.

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  • 862-03353976

    A young Afar girl at Filwoha in the Awash National Park. Filwoha in the Afar language means 'hot water'. The beautiful springs are surrounded by doum palms and rise from deep underground at about 96.8 degrees F.

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  • 862-03353975

    An Afar girl with braided hair has very noticeable scarification on her cheeks. Scarification is practiced in only a few sections of her tribe. Proud and fiercely independent,the nomadic Afar people live in the low-lying deserts of Eastern Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03366121

    Childhood is brief in nomadic communities. From an early age,Turkana girls help their mothers with the household chores and look after their younger brothers and sisters during the day. The baby has wooden charms round her neck to ward off evil spirits.

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  • 862-03353972

    An Afar girl has her attractive hairstyle embellished with buttons and beads,which is typical of the young girls of her tribe. Proud and fiercely independent,the nomadic Afar people live in the low-lying deserts of Eastern Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03366098

    A Turkana woman makes the final ties to the dome-shaped framework of her home. In wet weather,hides will be laid on top and secured with leather thongs.

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  • 862-03808716

    A Maasai girl from the Kisongo clan wearing an attractive beaded headband.

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  • 862-03355121

    A young Datoga man tends his family's livestock on the plains east of Lake Manyara in Northern Tanzania.The Datoga (known to their Maasai neighbours as the Mang'ati and to the Iraqw as Babaraig) live in northern Tanzania and are primarily pastoralists..

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  • 862-03353970

    The fetching hairstyle of a young Afar girl. Proud and fiercely independent,the nomadic Afar people live in the low-lying deserts of Eastern Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03366059

    A Samburu woman resplendent in her beaded necklaces and numerous bracelets makes best use of a large rainwater pond to wash herself. Water is scarce in much of Samburuland.

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  • 862-03888699

    A young Pokot girl wearing a traditional broad necklace made of hollow reed grass that denotes her uninitiated status. The Pokot are pastoralists speaking a Southern Nilotic language.

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  • 862-03355143

    A Maasai woman wearing a very fine beaded necklace. The predominant white colour of her glass beadwork marks her as a Kisingo Maasai,the largest clan group of her tribe living either side of the Kenya-Tanzania border.

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  • 862-03366173

    Young Maasai girls decorate their faces with ochre and clay in preparation for a dance.

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  • 862-03888695

    Pokot women and girls dancing to celebrate an Atelo ceremony. The Pokot are pastoralists speaking a Southern Nilotic language.

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  • 862-03820650

    Samburu girls are given strings of beads by their fathers when they are still young. As soon as they are old enough to have lovers from the warrior age set, they regularly receive gifts from them.Over a period of years, their necklaces can smother them up to their necks.

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  • 862-03355142

    Maasai girls gather to celebrate a wedding. Their broad beaded necklaces with predominantly white glass beads mark then as Kisongo Maasai,the largest clan group of the tribe which lives either side of the Kenya-Tanzania border.

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  • 862-03807769

    Kenya, Samburu District. Young Samburu girl in traditional beaded necklaces.

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  • 862-03366189

    Two Giriama girls pound corn outside their home using a large wooden mortar and pestles. Their small skirts are made from strips of printed cotton material - a traditional dress of Giriama women and children.

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  • 848-03272987

    Baka tribe members using fiber to make crowns and clothing for the spirit figure that will dance with them at a hunting ceremony, Cameroon

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  • 862-03354095

    Two young Karo girls stand in front of the massive trunk of a fig tree. A small Omotic tribe related to the Hamar,who live along the banks of the Omo River in southwestern Ethiopia,the Karo are renowned for their elaborate body painting using white chalk,crushed rock and other natural pigments.

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  • 700-02693944

    Himba Woman with Baby, Namibia

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  • 862-03366132

    Song is an art form ingrained in Turkana culture. At the end of a dance session,the participants invariably enjoy the Song of the Bulls. Each young man will take centre-stage to extol the praises of his favourite ox. He will explain how it came into his possession,its distinguishing traits and with outstretched arms,imitate the shape of its horns.

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  • 862-03366588

    A pretty Samburu girl in traditional attire.

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  • 862-03366607

    A Turkana girl with a large gourd-like container used as a receptacle for water or milk. In the absence of gourds,the Turkana carve their containers from soft wood,such as that from the common commiphora species,which thrives in semi-arid country.

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  • 862-03437161

    A young Maasai girl wears a headband decorated with chains and cowrie shells that signifies her recent circumcision. Clitodectomy was commonly practiced by the Maasai but it is now gradually dying out.

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  • 862-03366058

    During Samburu wedding celebrations,warriors resplendent with long Ochred braids dance with young girls who have put on all their finery for the occasion. Both warriors and girls smear their faces,necks and shoulders with red ochre mixed with animal fat to enhance their appearance. Two spears are tipped with ostrich-feather pompoms.

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  • 862-03366050

    Young Samburu girls dance during a wedding celebration. By arching their backs and thrusting out their chests,they flick their beaded necklaces up and down while dancing silently to the songs of the warriors. Their bodies and necklaces have been smeared with red ochre.

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  • 862-03366115

    A jovial group of Turkana girls in traditional attire. Their aprons are made of goatskin,either beaded or cut into thin strips before braiding. The two girls in the middle have already had the flesh below their lower lips pierced in readiness for a brass ornament after marriage.

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  • 862-03366108

    In the semi-arid terrain of Turkanaland,women have to travel great distances to collect firewood. Like other Nilotic people,Turkana women balance heavy loads on their heads with graceful carriage and poise. The attire of this woman is typical of married women in the tribe.

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  • 862-03365986

    A young Laikipiak Maasai girl.

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  • 862-03354065

    A Nyangatom woman grinds sorghum using two stones. Typical of her tribe,she wears a heavily beaded calfskin skirt,multiple layers of bead necklaces and metal bracelets and amulets. The Nyangatom or Bume are a Nilotic tribe of semi-nomadic pastoralists who live along the banks of the Omo River in south-western Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03366283

    A close-up of a Pokot woman's earrings,hairstyle and beaded ornaments. Only married women wear brass earrings and glass-beaded collars. The band over her head supports the weight of her heavy earrings.

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  • 700-02694001

    Portrait of Himba Girl, Opuwo, Namibia

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  • 862-03366133

    Song is an art form ingrained in Turkana culture. After months of separation,young men and girls gather together during the rains when grass is abundant and life is relatively easy for a while. The Turkana have a rich repertoire of at least twenty dances,most of which are quite energetic.

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  • 862-03888711

    The Pokot have a small ceremony called Koyogho when a man pays his in-laws the balance of the agreed dowry for his wife. At the conclusion of the ritual, his wife is given a large gourd of milk which she carries home on her back with her youngest child.

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  • 862-03355141

    A Maasai girl in traditional attire. The predominant white colour of her beadwork and the circular scar on her cheek denote that she is from the Kisongo section of the Maasai,the largest clan group,which lives either side of the border in Kenya and Tanzania.

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  • 862-03437080

    A Nyangatom girl weaves a grass basket. The Nyangatom or Bume are a Nilotic tribe of semi-nomadic pastoralists who live along the banks of the Omo River in south-western Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03354081

    A young Dassanech girl holds her little brother. She wears a leather skirt with an elaborate fringe of wooden and metal tassles. Much the largest of the tribes in the Omo Valley numbering around 50,000,the Dassanech (also known as the Galeb,Changila or Merille) are Nilotic pastoralists and agriculturalists.

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  • 862-03888697

    Pokot women and girls dancing to celebrate an Atelo ceremony. The Pokot are pastoralists speaking a Southern Nilotic language.

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  • 700-02694016

    Himba Girl, Opuwo, Namibia

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  • 862-03366279

    Two jovial Pokot girls set off with leather bags in search of edible berries. Pokot girls and women traditionally wore leather skirts and capes made from home-tanned goatskins. The necklaces of young girls are made from small segments of sedge grass.

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  • 862-03366186

    A Galla girl from Kenya's Coast Province.

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  • 700-02694014

    Portrait of Himba Woman With Baby, Kaokoveld, Namibia

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  • 862-03366055

    During Samburu wedding celebrations,married women congregate apart from the warriors and young girls to sing in praise of the couple and to dance.

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  • 700-02694003

    Portrait of Himba Woman Breastfeeding Baby, Opuwo, Namibia

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  • 862-03437159

    Turkana girls return home from a Waterhole with water containers made of wood. Their cloaks are goatskin embellished with glass beads.

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  • 862-03366047

    Samburu girls are given strings of beads by their fathers when they are still young. As soon as they are old enough to have lovers from the warrior age-set,they regularly receive gifts from them. Over a period of years,their necklaces can smother them up to their necks. The metal cross-like ornament hanging from the girl's headband has no religious significance.

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  • 862-03808715

    A Maasai girl from the Kisongo clan wearing an attractive beaded headband and necklace.

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  • 862-03353992

    An attractive girl from the Kediyo tribe carries a large,beautifully made umbrella. Its wooden frame is covered with the dried leaves of ensete,the false banana plant (seen growing in the background). Widely cultivated in southern Ethiopia,ensete roots and stems,which are rich in carbohydrates,are either cooked and eaten as a porridge or made into bread.

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  • 862-03366056

    During Samburu wedding celebrations,married women congregate apart from the warriors and young girls to sing in praise of the couple and to dance.

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  • 862-03366028

    In the early morning,young Samburu girls take kids to their mothers. They will then milk the nanny goats leaving half the milk for the kids. Only women and children milk goats although every member of the family will drink the milk.

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  • 862-03355175

    A Hadza girl wearing a beaded headband and necklaces.The Hadzabe are a thousand-strong community of hunter-gatherers who have lived in the Lake Eyasi basin for centuries. They are one of only four or five societies in the world that still earn a living primarily from wild resources.

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  • 862-03355134

    In the early morning,a Maasai herdsboy and his sister drive their family's flock of sheep across the friable,dusty plains near Malambo in northern Tanzania.

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  • 700-02693942

    Himba Children Sitting on Floor of Hut, Namibia

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  • 700-02693943

    Two Himba Children, Namibia

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  • 862-03366174

    A young Maasai girl wearing a wooden plug in her pierced ear to elongate the earlobe. It has been a tradition of the Maasai for both men and women to pierce their ears and elongate their lobes for decorative purposes. Her two lower incisors have been removed - a common practice that may have resulted from an outbreak of lockjaw a long time ago.

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  • 862-03366383

    Laikipiak Maasai Girl Dancing

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  • 862-03366046

    Samburu girls are given strings of beads by their fathers when they are still young. As soon as they are old enough to have lovers from the warrior age-set,they regularly receive gifts from them. Over a period of years,their necklaces can smother them up to their necks. The metal cross-like ornament hanging from the girl's headband has no religious significance.

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  • 862-03366405

    Gabbra women sing and dance to celebrate a wedding. The traditional metal ornamentation on their heads is called malmal.

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  • 862-03366406

    Gabbra women sing and dance to celebrate a wedding. The traditional metal ornamentation on their heads is called malmal.

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  • 862-03355173

    A Hadza woman digs for edible tubers with a digging stick.The Hadzabe are a thousand-strong community of hunter-gatherers who have lived in the Lake Eyasi basin for centuries. They are one of only four or five societies in the world that still earn a living primarily from wild resources.

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  • 862-03366138

    Turkana women and girls are responsible for watering livestock,which is unusual among pastoral societies. Here,a young girl waters goats from a waterhole dug in the sand of a seasonal watercourse. Her young brother will control the flow of stock to the water trough. In the background,a man digs out another waterhole; they have to been deepened regularly towards the end of the dry season.

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  • 700-01993278

    Portrait of Hamer Tribeswoman, Omo Valley, Ethiopia

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  • 700-02694015

    Portrait of Himba Girl, Opuwo, Namibia

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  • 862-06542285

    Merti, Northern Kenya. Two children peer from the door of their home.

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  • 862-03820557

    A Nyangatom mother and young daughter in typical dress. Rugged skin clothing is still widely used.The Nyangatom are one of the largest tribes and arguably the most warlike people living along the Omo River in Southwest Ethiopia.

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  • 862-03366589

    A Samburu woman wearing a mporro necklace,which signifies her married status.These necklaces,once made of hair from giraffe tails,are now made from fibres of doum palm fronds (Hyphaene coriacea). The beads are mid-19th century Venetian glass beads,which were introduced to Samburuland by early hunters and traders.

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  • 862-03366135

    Song is an art form ingrained in Turkana culture. At the end of a dance session,the participants invariably enjoy the Song of the Bulls. Each young man will take centre-stage to extol the praises of his favourite ox. He will explain how it came into his possession,its distinguishing traits and with outstretched arms,imitate the shape of its horns.

    Rights-Managed

  • 862-03437157

    A young Samburu girl dances during a wedding celebration. By arching her back and thrusting out her chest,she flicks her beaded necklaces up and down while dancing silently to the songs of the warriors. Her body and necklace have been smeared with red ochre,and her eyebrows blackened with charcoal dust mixed with animal fat.

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  • 862-03366172

    A young Maasai girl in all her finery pauses at the entrance to her mother's home. The wall and roof of the house are plastered with a mixture of cow dung and soil.

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  • 862-03366120

    A proud Turkana father and his young daughter. Both their hairstyles are typical of tribal custom in the west of Turkanaland.

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  • 862-03820644

    A Samburu woman wearing a mporro necklace, which denotes her married status. These necklaces were once made of hair from giraffe tails but nowadays, the fibres of doum palm fronds, Hyphaene coriacea, are used instead.The red beads after which the necklace is named are wound glass beads made in Venice c.1850.

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